Hidden Losses in Adoption

As with most everything in life, adoption has positive and negative elements.  None of us wants to acknowledge the negative, painful side–that is, loss.  But the truth is, the very act of adoption is built upon loss.  For the birth parents, the loss of their biological offspring, the relationship that could have been, a very part of themselves.  For the adoptive parents…, the loss of giving birth to the child they call their own, the child whose face will never mirror theirs. dreamstime_15618560 And for the adopted child, the loss of the birth parents, the earliest experience of belonging and acceptance.  To deny adoption loss is to deny the emotional reality of everyone involved. An adoptee’s wounds are hardly ever talked about. They are the proverbial elephant in the living room.  Dr. David M. Brodzinsky and Dr. Marshall D. Schecter, a psychologist and psychiatrist specializing in adoption, say in their insightful book Being Adopted: The Lifelong Search for Self, that loss for the adoptee is “unlike other losses we have come to expect in a lifetime, such as death and divorce. Adoption is more pervasive, less socially recognized, and more profound.” Grief is the natural response to loss, and those touched by adoption must be given permission to revisit emotionally the place of loss, feel the pain, scream the anger, cry the tears, and then allow themselves to be loved by others.  If left unresolved, this grief can and often does sabotage the strongest of families and the deepest potential within the adopted child.  It can undermine the most sincere parental commitment and force adoptees to suffer in private, choosing either rebellion or conformity as a mode of relating. Since adoption loss is somewhat difficult to understand, I will use the gardening technique of grafting to illustrate not only adoption loss but a variety of adoption dynamics. A Lesson from Nature A grafted tree. Magnificent to behold. One of a kind. Contrary to nature. Luxurious leaves and intricate roots. Loaded with horticultural challenges for a gardener, but ultimately yielding a tree with unparalleled beauty. The adopted child. Magnificent to behold. One of a kind. Biological features often contrary to yours. Intricate roots that need to be healed.  Loaded with behavioral challenges for parents, but ultimately yielding a life of unparalleled beauty. How do you react to the above? Some might be saying, “Yes! A thousand times, yes! This describes our child. She is one of a kind and we are so glad she is ours.” Others may be saying, “You’d better believe our adopted child presents us with challenges! He can peel wallpaper off a wall at the speed of a shining bullet, make holes in the drywall of his room, be verbally and physically rebellious, tear up anything in his room, and then collapse in a pool of tears.” Wherever you are in the spectrum of possible reactions, believe me, you are not alone!

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